Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 10, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 10, 2012

Aug 13, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Managing Effectively in a Matrix (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: The skills needed for a leader to thrive in a matrix operating environment — empathy, conflict management, influence and self-awareness — can be identified, developed and honed. Organizations and individual leaders need to take the initiative to broaden their traditional notions of what it takes to succeed as a leader and start taking a closer look at measuring, cultivating and rewarding these crucial matrix-related leadership capabilities.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



Managing Effectively in a Matrix


By Ruth Malloy


Big Idea: The skills needed for a leader to thrive in a matrix operating environment — empathy, conflict management, influence and self-awareness — can be identified, developed and honed. Organizations and individual leaders need to take the initiative to broaden their traditional notions of what it takes to succeed as a leader and start taking a closer look at measuring, cultivating and rewarding these crucial matrix-related leadership capabilities..


HBR Blog Network


August 10, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
The Problem With Performance Reviews (NYTimes)
Big Idea: At TerraCycle, a culture has been built where feedback is given often and evenly to all 110 employees. They do this through a weekly reporting that requires every department to submit a detailed biweekly report to the whole company (every employee). In other words, everyone in the company sees the same reports that top management does.

Corporate Success vs. Failure – 30 Points of Distinction (Forbes)
Big Idea: Businesses don’t fail – leaders do. So in an attempt to help leaders understand what it takes to make the shift from the old paradigm to the new Mike Myatt created an image to help leaders connect the dots – an image to conduct an assessment of your organization, and then use it as a leadership road map for change.

Blank Checks: Unleashing the Potential of People and Businesses (Strategy+Business)
Big Idea: In 2007, the leadership team of Kraft’s developing markets identified Tang as one of their top 10 focus brands, and came up with an unusual strategy for boosting the brand’s sales back into the stratosphere: Tang leaders in key countries such as Brazil were given a “blank check,” essentially urging them to dream big and not worry about resources. The results have been astounding.

Autonomy or Compliance? Navigating the Balance (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: How do you enable people to take the initiative to make needed creative decisions in their work with the equally important discipline needed to follow standard procedures?  The answer isn’t obvious.

 

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 10, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 10, 2012

Aug 13, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
“Rogue IT” is about to wreak havoc at work (Fortune Tech)
Big Idea: In the past, enterprise software and hardware decisions were often the exclusive domain of a company’s chief information officer or CIO, the senior executive in charge of information technology and computer systems.  Rogue IT turns that model on its head, effectively crowdsourcing IT choices to employees.

Article of the Week

Emerging Technology



 ”Rogue IT” is about to wreak havoc at work


By Ryan Holmes


Big Idea: In the past, enterprise software and hardware decisions were often the exclusive domain of a company’s chief information officer or CIO, the senior executive in charge of information technology and computer systems.  Rogue IT turns that model on its head, effectively crowdsourcing IT choices to employees.


Fortune Tech


August 9, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Supermarkets Try Customizing Prices for Shoppers (NYTimes)
Big Idea: Airlines, hotels and rental cars have offered variable prices for years.  Now grocers like Safeway and Kroger are going one step further, each offering differing methods to determine individualized prices. Hoping to improve razor-thin profit margins, they are creating specific offers and prices, based on shoppers’ behaviors, that could encourage them to spend more.

Mitigate the Risk in Social Media Selling (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Sales reps now have the ability to participate in global conversations about their products, their field, and their expertise. But some companies are so worried about potential mistakes or loss of control that they don’t allow participation. That’s a bad idea.  Choosing not to be present in social networks puts your company and your salespeople at a competitive disadvantage. Instead, acknowledge the risks and mitigate them.

SAP: Using Social Media for Building, Selling and Supporting (MIT Sloan Management Review)
Big Idea: In a conversation with David Kiron, executive editor of Innovation Hubs at MIT Sloan Management Review, Yolton talked about how SAP has continually modernized its online forums, how it nurtures idea development through crowd sourcing at its Idea Place, and the value of being able to communicate directly with millions of customers whenever it launches a new product or service.

Big data magic trick: Show me a doorway, I’ll tell you the city (Gigaom)
Big Idea: Soon, it seems, computers might know our world better than we do. Google is training computers to spot common images on video streams and match user photos of landmarks and other things against its image database. Facial-recognition software could help you identify a complete stranger in the crowd. And now, a group of researchers have created an algorithm that can identify cities based on their unique architectural elements and other distinguishing characteristics.

OMG, Your Fridge Has The Cutest Profile Pic Ever! (Fast Company)
Big Idea: As technology has become cheaper and we have become more connected, companies and consumers have started to fantasize about the endless possibilities of wireless control and monitoring for everything from pill bottles to toasters to heart monitoring collars that could let sheep text their shepherd.

NYPD, Microsoft Launch All-Seeing “Domain Awareness System” With Real-Time CCTV (Fast Company)
Big Idea: The New York Police Department is embracing online surveillance in a wide-eyed way. Representatives from Microsoft and the NYPD announced the launch of their new Domain Awareness System (DAS). Using DAS, police are able to monitor thousands of CCTV cameras around the five boroughs, scan license plates, find out the kind of radiation cars are emitting, and extrapolate info on criminal and terrorism suspects from dozens of criminal databases … all in near-real time.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 3, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 3, 2012

Aug 6, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Is Busyness Bad for Business? (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Perhaps we are not so much caught in a “busy trap”, as a “meaning trap”. A meaningful life involves pursuing what we truly value, a sense of contribution in our work, as well as time outside of work. It’s perhaps no surprise that the great leaders were also expert at modeling work-life integration; they valued not only busyness but also meaning. How did their emphasis on both impact the bottom line? Positively.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



Is Busyness Bad for Business?


By Susan David


Big Idea: Perhaps we are not so much caught in a “busy trap”, as a “meaning trap”. A meaningful life involves pursuing what we truly value, a sense of contribution in our work, as well as time outside of work. It’s perhaps no surprise that the great leaders were also expert at modeling work-life integration; they valued not only busyness but also meaning. How did their emphasis on both impact the bottom line? Positively.


HBR Blog Network


August 3, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Let’s Bring Back Accountability (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: So, how do we help our cultures, ourselves, our people overcome the fear of failure and commit in a uncertain world? Deborah Mills-Scofield offers a few suggestions based on her experience in both accountable, and unaccountable, company cultures.

Why You Need Dissatisfied Employees (Forbes)
Big Idea: Consider all the money, time and effort companies pour into finding, training and retaining talent in the hopes of seeing performance rise. CEOs who want results must create a healthy state of dissatisfaction in the work environment. A credo of “Don’t worry, be happy” is a recipe for individual and organizational mediocrity.

Motivate Your Core Performers to Become Star Performers (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: You will be able to coax better performance from your team by treating your sales force like a portfolio of investments that require different levels and kinds of attention. Sales compensation plans that take into account the different needs of different salespeople — and that are based on real evidence rather than assumptions — will ensure that your sales department gets a significantly higher return on its investments.

Realizing the Value of People Management (bcg.perspectives)
Big Idea: There’s yet another compelling reason to remain committed to investing in people: companies that do so enjoy better economic performance. Those that excel in leadership development, talent management, and performance management, for example, experience substantially higher revenue growth and profit margins.

Transformational Leadership In Agile Manufacturing: Wikispeed (Forbes)
Big Idea: Wikispeed works in self-organizing teams with one week sprints. Using Scrum, the team iterates the entire car every seven days. That means every seven days they re-evaluate each part of the car and re-invent the next highest priority aspects to be worked on. This way of working radically accelerates the pace of innovation. Within each sprint, the teams use Kanban boards to picture and optimize the flow of work within those sprints.

Debating Disaster in Order to Prepare for It (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Based on my long experience in a major, diversified global company, I strongly urge companies to have this type of carefully structured internal debate at the core of their risk management process. The constructive tension created by competing teams, and the strong encouragement and support of business leaders are essential. Without them, the risks of inattention, complacency and failure to examine key technical, financial or other assumptions can lead to a corporation’s people, facilities, information and supply chain being overwhelmed by events.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 3, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Aug 3, 2012

Aug 6, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Two-Speed IT: A Linchpin For Success in a Digitized World (bcg.perspectives)
Big Idea: Capturing the advantages offered by the digital age demands changes throughout the company. The IT organization, in particular, needs to reinvent itself. Developing a second speed of delivery should be a key aim of that reinvention.

Article of the Week

Emerging Technology



 Two-Speed IT: A Linchpin For Success in a Digitized World


By Antoine Gourevitch, Benjamin Rehberg, and Jean-Francois Bobier


Big Idea: Capturing the advantages offered by the digital age demands changes throughout the company. The IT organization, in particular, needs to reinvent itself. Developing a second speed of delivery should be a key aim of that reinvention.


bcg.perspectives


August 1, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
E-Commerce Style Big Data Analytics Meet Brick And Mortar Retailers (Forbes)
Big Idea: Now physical stores have tools to collect data on their shoppers by monitoring their movement, and their pauses, as they move around the aisles of real stores. RetailNext is one of the providers of shopper intelligence through video that can provide up to 10,000 data points per store visitor, allowing stores to, for example, develop heat maps so they can put the items they want to sell in areas of the stores with the most traffic. Coming soon — cameras that can detect a shopper’s mood through facial expressions. Try that online!

Talk to Me, One Machine Said to the Other (NYTimes)
Big Idea: Ocado, an online grocery store in England, prides itself on its delivery of refrigerated foods: When the company says the goods will arrive at a certain temperature, they mean it. The promise is more than a marketing boast. Aided by microchip transmitters, heat sensors and a fast-growing form of wireless communication, the boast is a measurable fact.

Big Technology Change Without Big Risk (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Companies can execute major process improvements to reduce risk and allow organizational learning by breaking projects down into a series of small, reversible experiments. This approach reduces risks and allows people to learn from each, and make adjustments as they go. But when the change involves a new information technology, it’s harder to make incremental updates.

Startup idol Axonify is training to thrill (Fortune Tech)
Big Idea: Instead of packing training into one grueling engagement, the startup Axonify, breaks lessons into shorter, ongoing sessions. Consisting of trivia-style questions and mini-games, each training takes 90 seconds or less to complete. Over time, the cloud-based software picks up on areas that workers are having trouble with and personalizes training accordingly.

Social Project Management Gets Big Picture View (The Brainyard)
Big Idea: Described as “less about the day to day task management, more about strategic, long term resource planning,” 10,000ft is easy to see as part of a broader trend of focusing social software on getting work done, along with software services like Do.com and Asana.

Human Workers, Managed by an Algorithm (Technology Review)
Big Idea: Stephanie Hamilton is part of something larger than herself. She’s part of a computer program. She recently began performing small tasks assigned to her by an algorithm running on a computer in Berkeley, California. That software, developed by a startup called MobileWorks, represents the latest trend in crowdsourcing: organizing foreign workers on a mass scale to do routine jobs that computers aren’t yet good at, like checking spreadsheets or reading receipts.

Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare as Corporate Focus Groups (NYTimes)
Big Idea: Frito-Lay is developing a new potato chip flavor, which, in the old days, would have involved a series of focus groups, research and trend analysis.  Visitors to the new Lay’s Facebook app are asked to suggest new flavors and click an “I’d Eat That” button to register their preferences. So far, the results show that a beer-battered onion-ring flavor is popular in California and Ohio, while a churros flavor is a hit in New York.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 27, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 27, 2012

Jul 30, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
How Companies Will Googlefy Your Career (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: The best way to understand the trajectory of your high performance career tomorrow is to look at what’s happening to college undergraduates today. Judgment and personal experience will matter less. Statistical context will matter more. America is now training a next generation workforce that accepts a prominent and dominant role for predictive analytics in performance assessment.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



How Companies Will Googlefy Your Career


By Michael Schrage


Big Idea:  The best way to understand the trajectory of your high performance career tomorrow is to look at what’s happening to college undergraduates today. Judgment and personal experience will matter less. Statistical context will matter more. America is now training a next generation workforce that accepts a prominent and dominant role for predictive analytics in performance assessment.


HBR Blog Network


July 26, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
The Key Missing Ingredient In Leadership Today (Forbes)
Big Idea: Real leadership is about transforming the system.  Leadership is not merely about success. Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King were great leaders, not because they were successful within their different worlds, or even because they were successful despite the constraints of their worlds. They were great leaders because they transformed their worlds.

Why Rating Goals Doesn’t Work (The Rypple Blog)
Big Idea: Whether you’re rating goals numerically or using qualitative ratings like “performs well” and “underperforms,” it reduces goals — whether they be hard success metrics or soft, behavior-based personal objectives — to impersonal measures you can quantify and rate. It forces equality between disparate goals, whether they be significant, long-term personal improvements or quarterly, performance-based metrics.

The X Factor That Will Determine Marissa Mayer’s Success At Yahoo (Fast Company)
Big Idea: If your success depends on how cool others think you are, and that depends on how cool you believe yourself to be, it’s worthwhile to sit down for a minute to pick apart what it takes to own your coolness. It will trigger a self-fulfilling cycle. Here are three tips to start.

Why Aren’t You Delegating? (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Delegation is a critical skill. “Your most important task as a leader is to teach people how to think and ask the right questions so that the world doesn’t go to hell if you take a day off,” says Jeffrey Pfeffer, the Thomas D. Dee II. Delegation benefits managers, direct reports, and organizations. Yet it remains one of the most underutilized and underdeveloped management capabilities.

Yes, You Can Brainstorm Without Groupthink (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: We are strong advocates of collaboration in innovation, and believe that the proper use of brainstorming techniques is a powerful tool in the collaborative approach. Over our many years of experience, we have seen managers effectively use three simple techniques for avoiding “Groupthink” during brainstorming. Here’s our advice.

Keep Experts on Tap, Not on Top (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Generalists are those who have broad knowledge but lack deep domain expertise. Most generalists do not claim to be expert at anything, making them psychologically more receptive to ideas distant or different from their own. They are, it seems, more aware of what they do not know and understand that there is a large body of information that they do not know they do not know.  Why does this matter? When facing massive uncertainty, as exists in today’s highly interconnected global economy, it is essential to appreciate both what one does know as well as what one does not know.

Editor’s Choice Articles for Week Ending Jul 20, 2012

Editor’s Choice Articles for Week Ending Jul 20, 2012

Jul 24, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
The 100 Most Important People in Your Company (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: CEOs need to connect not only with their most senior managers, but with broader groups of their companies’ most influential and productive people. To provide effective leadership, they shouldn’t be stealing off to small, secretive conclaves. CEOs should find ways to engage their “Critical 100.”

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



The 100 Most Important People in Your Company


By Ram Charan and Daniel Casse


Big Idea:  CEOs need to connect not only with their most senior managers, but with broader groups of their companies’ most influential and productive people. To provide effective leadership, they shouldn’t be stealing off to small, secretive conclaves. CEOs should find ways to engage their “Critical 100.”


HBR Blog Network


July 17, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
It’s Time To Break Up With Break-Out Groups (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Break-out groups are intended to break up the monotony of a long meeting and get people talking to each other on key topics. These are worthy goals; break-out groups are just lousy at realizing them. What could work better? McAfee thinks time slots devoted to mini “unconferences” would.

The Rise And Rise Of Influence (Fast Company)
Big Idea: As influence grows you can bet that many users will try to bump up their score, and that will strengthen the power of this whole new type of discovery economy. Will we one day wander through a shopping mall with our influence score being transmitted via Bluetooth from our smartphones, in the hope we’ll get a discount or a special offer in a store? Better pump up your influence just in case.

How Millennials Are Redefining Their Careers As Hustlers (Forbes)
Big Idea: “Millennials aren’t just position players,” says Ross Martin of Viacom’s trend-spotting and innovation division, Scratch. “They don’t just play first base or left field. They are ‘athletes,’ and their external hard drives are wired to do many things at once.” …Meanwhile, a growing number of companies are recognizing how this cross-pollination provides fresh insight and innovative strategies.

To Make Big Plans A Reality, Be Clear–Crystal Clear–About Each Incremental Step (Fast Company)
Big Idea: As a leader, you need to get comfortable with the fact that creating real clarity is going to raise conflict. It’s going to expose disagreements and gaps.  Being “fuzzy” about the details and expectations may be more comfortable in the moment, but the false niceness it creates prevents forward progress because no one can see clearly what to do!

The Future Isn’t About Mobile; It’s About Mobility (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Mobility trumps mobile. The difference between mobility and mobile is like the difference between hardware and software. Mobile is linked to devices — it is always one thing, wherever it is. But mobility changes with context: cultures incorporate mobile technologies differently. Mobile itself is the nuts, bolts, and infrastructure, while mobility is the context which determines if it all works together or doesn’t.

The Pros And Cons Of Forced Rankings: A Manager’s Perspective (Forbes)
Big Idea: As a manager with MassMutual Financial Group (a well respected Fortune 500 company), Victor Lipman did see some benefits to forced ranking, though in the end he felt these benefits were outweighed by the managerial problems it caused.  That said, here are his two main conclusions.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 13, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 13, 2012

Jul 16, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Why Millennials Don’t Want To Buy Stuff (Fast Company)
Big Idea: People aren’t shopping to “own” things in the traditional sense anymore. Here are the real reasons people are purchasing things now–and what we can do to tap into this new power.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



Why Millennials Don’t Want To Buy Stuff


By Josh Allen Dykstra


Big Idea:  People aren’t shopping to “own” things in the traditional sense anymore. Here are the real reasons people are purchasing things now–and what we can do to tap into this new power.


Fast Company


July 13, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Act Fast, but Not Necessarily First (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: The faster we can execute a decision, the more time we free up to understand the task, gather information, and analyze the issues. If we require too much time to decide or act, we are forced to finish observing and orienting earlier. And if we act too quickly, we might respond to a problem that changes or even goes away before the deadline. The four-step OODA framework works for decisions of all types, small and large.

Bring Back the General Manager (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Obviously we can’t reverse the structural trends of the past two decades. However, companies can take steps to give their people more general management experience, which may help them avoid the narrowness of functional specialization. Here are several ideas.

When the Crowd Isn’t Wise (NYTimes)
Big Idea: The answer, I think, is to take the best of what both experts and markets have to offer, realizing that the combination of the two offers a better window onto the future than either alone. Markets are at their best when they can synthesize large amounts of disparate information, as on an election night. Experts are most useful when a system exists to identify the most truly knowledgeable — a system that often resembles a market.

Keep Your Sarbanes-Oxley Off My CFO (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Certainly, let the board, and the audit committee, spend all the time they need, in whatever setting they choose, getting whatever reports they request and asking whatever questions they need to ask. Let them continue to expect nothing but straightforward, honest answers, and let all CFOs know that their jobs depend on being candid and honest…But let CFOs do their jobs. Let them continue to report to, and support, their CEO bosses. Asking executives other than the CEO to report directly to the board will set a foolish and dangerous precedent.

Q: What’s Info-Finding Site Mancx’s Big Idea? A: Charging Money For Facts (Fast Company)
Big Idea: Mattias had read a book by Charlie Stross called Accelerando, where the main character, Manford Mancx, is an information broker in the future. We realized how hard it was to get a hold of good, solid information online. We decided to create a marketplace for information. Say you need to know where your competitor is buying or sourcing their material, for example. Mancx enables people to buy and sell this information.

5 Tips for Managing a Decentralized Workforce (Inc.)
Big Idea: When an entire team works under the same roof challenges exist; but their proximity allows them to quickly address any issue and deal with it directly. It’s much more complicated when you have a team spread across multiple offices. The following five- step program will help you manage a decentralized workforce.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 13, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 13, 2012

Jul 16, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Change – 3 Essentials For Every Leader (Innovation Excellence)
Big Idea: Leaders concerned with the cost of change should be far more concerned about the cost of not changing. The best of human ingenuity and accomplishment are experienced through change. To learn, create, advance, develop, and sustain, we must change. If you accept this premise as true, then my question is this: why do so many businesses struggle with the practice of change?

Article of the Week

Cultural Cohesion



 Change – 3 Essentials For Every Leader


By Mike Myatt


Big Idea: Leaders concerned with the cost of change should be far more concerned about the cost of not changing. The best of human ingenuity and accomplishment are experienced through change. To learn, create, advance, develop, and sustain, we must change. If you accept this premise as true, then my question is this: why do so many businesses struggle with the practice of change?


Innovation Excellence


July 9, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Company Culture: Business Values Lead to Profits? Let’s Prove It (Inc.)
Big Idea: At some point more than 15 years ago we defined our company purpose and core values, those behaviors that would never change no matter what else changes in our business.  I started to hear employees talking about these core values in meetings and using them to guide important business decisions.  That’s when I realized that a code of ethics means everything to our business.

Emotional Contagion Can Take Down Your Whole Team (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: How much do emotions matter in the workplace? Walk into any Department of Motor Vehicles and you’ll feel the impact of the prevailing mood instantly — a dense fog of sourness, irritability, and listlessness. Walk into almost any Apple store and you’ll experience the opposite — a sense of aliveness and excitement that raises your energy (and makes you want to buy something).

The Critical Path #45: Management vs. Leadership (5X5)
Big Idea: We start with a discussion of RIM’s latest quarterly performance and follow with a description of the inherent tension between managing and leading. To further illustrate this divergence we discuss the conflicting messages from Microsoft relative to the Surface.

Management Lessons From The London Olympics (FastCompany)
Big Idea: London is ready. No matter what it looks like close up, this massive project involving thousands of people, hundreds of groups, and billions of pounds, will be ready when they light the flame on 27 July. As for me, the experience offered a nice refresher course on a few easily overlooked laws of leadership.

Joel Babbit of MNN, on James Bond’s Lesson for C.E.O.’s (NYTimes)
Big Idea: I’m not as focused on superficial things, which I was when I started out. Back then, the number of employees I had was a big deal. The more, the better. Clients? The more, the better. Now I realize how unimportant those things are in the scheme of things. I want fewer people, less management and process, and more actual work. That leads to greater profit, by the way.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 6, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 6, 2012

Jul 9, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
If Happiness Is An Inalienable Right, How Come We’re Not Happier? (Forbes)
Big Idea: A wholly different way of managing has emerged – agile and radical management. The goal of the firm is meaningful: adding value for customers, not just making money. When workers have a direct line of sight to customers and can see the impact of what they do, they see meaning in their work. When work is done in self-organizing teams, this in turn generates engagement and strong horizontal relationships. The workplace thus creates the possibility of happiness in people’s lives, as well as making tons of money for the firm.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation



If Happiness Is An Inalienable Right, How Come We’re Not Happier?


By Steve Denningl


Big Idea:  A wholly different way of managing has emerged – agile and radical management. The goal of the firm is meaningful: adding value for customers, not just making money. When workers have a direct line of sight to customers and can see the impact of what they do, they see meaning in their work. When work is done in self-organizing teams, this in turn generates engagement and strong horizontal relationships. The workplace thus creates the possibility of happiness in people’s lives, as well as making tons of money for the firm.


Forbes


July 4, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Curation: How the Global Brain Evolves (Wired)
Big Idea: “Content curation is the natural evolution of our globally networked consciousness. This sounds like a bunch of hippie drivel, but we really are creating a global brain, of sorts, by encoding human knowledge and tracking human activity. Using the human nodes of this network to strengthen some of these connections while weakening others (by choosing either to pass along i.e. ‘curate’ information or not to pass it along) helps this global brain function better as a system…When we curate, for whatever reason and in whatever form, we are enhancing a connection in the global neural network we are inadvertently creating.”

Measuring An Employee’s Worth? Consider Influence (FastCompany)
Big Idea: Today, your performance review is based on things like sales numbers or number of goals met. Tomorrow, though, it could be based on something that until now has remained ephemeral: organizational influence.  Salesforce.com’s Chatter system released a new feature this spring called Influencer. It purports to measure how influential you are within your company, by tabulating, for example, how your fellow workers respond to the items you post to your corporate social network.

A Better Project Model than the “Waterfall” (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea:  The “agile” movement in IT is rapidly replacing the traditional “waterfall” approach to project management. Jeff Gothelf explains the core idea: shift the focus from preconceived requirements and outputs, and instead discover the best solution by focusing on measurable outcomes. Traditional strategy management suffers from the same “waterfall” paradigm. Strategy alignment and execution must adopt the “agile” approach, too.

Every Company Should Build a Second Corporation (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Now that the smart money assumes our demise, we need a system to ensure our survival. We need something that looks less like improv and more like engineering. We need a second corporation.

Declare Your Radicalness (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: Here’s the problem with incrementalism in a time of breakdown: it’s a bit like asking a mechanic to tune up your tasseled loafers for your pioneering voyage to the edges of interstellar space. But make no mistake: if it’s the tired realm of the clapped out possible you wish to take a quantum leap beyond, you’re going to need a rocket ship.

Time for a Nice Cold One! (Innovation Excellence)
Big Idea: When things heat up, it’s also a good time to cool down your business. I’m referring to giving it a “cold eye” review, whereby someone not involved with a particular system or process looks at it with fresh eyes to identify possible areas for improvement. When done well, the cold eye review often uncovers the obvious (things that were missed previously because people are so used to them), and occasionally discovers the unique.

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 6, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Jul 6, 2012

Jul 9, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Monet And The Art Of Intent (FastCompany)
Big Idea:  Intentions keep us focused on what is most important to us and guide our behaviors accordingly. In addition, unlike vision, intent situates responsibility. When the author of an idea states what he or she is trying to do, there is no question who is supposed to do it.

Article of the Week

Cultural Cohesion



 Monet And The Art Of Intent


By Michael O’Malley and William Baker


Big Idea: Intentions keep us focused on what is most important to us and guide our behaviors accordingly. In addition, unlike vision, intent situates responsibility. When the author of an idea states what he or she is trying to do, there is no question who is supposed to do it.


FastCompany


July 2, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Red Hat CEO: How to Inspire Employees (Inc.)
Big Idea: Change management is what you do to employees; when employees participate, change is what they do for the company and for themselves.

Conflict Keeps Teams at the Top of Their Game (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: What few people seem to realize is that even the most effective teams will feel conflict-prone at times. And there are good reasons for this. Teams composed of high-performing individuals are naturally subject to contradictory tensions, like cooperation and rivalry, trust and vigilance. These tensions should not be managed away — they are productive and can help teams perform better.

How To Properly Define “Great Leader”–And Act Like One (FastCompany)
Big Idea: A great leader helps a group of people identify what they want and how to get it, and then influences that group, free of coercion, to take coordinated action to achieve the desired outcomes. A great leader achieves results at a level far beyond what others achieve.

Niraj Shah of Wayfair.Com, on Employee Recognition (NYTimes)
Big Idea: One thing I’ve learned over time is that it’s important to take a minute and celebrate a win before you move on to the next thing you want to accomplish.

4 Leadership Lessons From The Founding Fathers (FastCompany)
Big Idea:  Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world, indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” She’s right. Here are four leadership principles our Founders taught us.

Recover Your Credibility (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea: When your words and actions don’t align, you have fallen into the Credibility Gap. When you have a credibility gap at your workplace, it is damaging to your reputation and to your career. And if you’re in a leadership or customer service role, your credibility gap could be hurting your company.

If Happiness Is An Inalienable Right, How Come We’re Not Happier? (Forbes)
Big Idea: The goal of the firm is meaningful: adding value for customers, not just making money. When workers have a direct line of sight to customers and can see the impact of what they do, they see meaning in their work. When work is done in self-organizing teams, this in turn generate engagement and strong horizontal relationships. The workplace thus creates the possibility of happiness in people’s lives, as well as making tons of money for the firm.

Hire Smart: Dump The Resume Pile, Start Playing Games (FastCompany)
Big Idea: Every talent-recruitment executive knows how hard it is to make a good new hire. But L’Oreal, the French cosmetics giant, is making hundreds of successful hires each year from a pool of thousands of highly qualified young prospects who connect with L’Oréal through business games.