Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Apr 27, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Apr 27, 2012

Posted by: on Apr 30, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Mirror Neurons and Their Role In Marketing
  (Fast Company)
Big Idea:  How your unconscious uses physical experiences to make sense of abstract ideas–even when you are only looking at the experience–holds enormous potential for people in the business of communication and marketing.

Article of the Week


Resource Fluidity


Mirror Neurons and Their Role In Marketing 


By Jacob Braude


 Big Idea:  How your unconscious uses physical experiences to make sense of abstract ideas–even when you are only looking at the experience–holds enormous potential for people in the business of communication and marketing. 

FastCompany


April 25, 2012


Editor’s Choice Articles
Shake Up Your Thinking with Flash Foresight
(Innovation Excellence)
Big Idea:  In his book “Flash Foresight” Daniel Burrus proposes that the future is not as unknowable as we think. He suggests that we can distinguish between cyclic change and linear change, as well as hard trends and soft trends. Armed with this information we can then determine which parts of the future we can be right about. This allows us to build our business plans based on some certainty rather than uncertainty.

The Hidden Power of Mundane ideas (HBR Blog Network)
Big Idea:  The same awareness of repeated customer sentiments applies to nearly any business. Sometimes changes can be obvious. Most of the time, we need to force ourselves to ask the right questions and brace ourselves for a thorough analysis of the mundane. That’s often where the real innovation lies.

How to Spot the Future (Wired)
Big Idea:  So how do we spot the future—and how might you? This article presents seven core principles that underlie many of our contemporary innovations.

Increase Your Team’s Motivation Five-Fold (HBR Blog Network)
Big idea:  Conventional approaches to change management underestimate this impact. The rational thinker sees it as a waste of time to let others self-discover what he or she already knows — why not just tell them and be done with it? Unfortunately this approach steals from others the energy needed to drive change that comes through a sense of ownership of “the answer.”

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