Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Apr 6, 2012

Editor’s Choices for Week Ending Apr 6, 2012

Posted by: on Apr 9, 2012 | No Comments

Article of the Week
Gary Hamel: What Matters Now: Passion! (Forbes)
Big Idea: As we move from the industrial economy to the knowledge economy and the creative economy, people are recognizing that creativity is born out of passion. It’s not something that can be commanded.

Article of the Week

Management Innovation 

Gary Hamel: What Matters Most Now: Passion!

Interview with Gary Hamel (By Steve Denning)

Big Idea: As we move from the industrial economy to the knowledge economy and the creative economy, people are recognizing that creativity is born out of passion. It’s not something that can be commanded.

Forbes

April 3, 2012

Editor’s Choice Articles
Clayton Christensen And The Innovators’ Smackdown (Forbes)
Big Idea: Achieving continuous innovation lies outside the performance envelope of firms focused on maximizing shareholder value. It requires major changes in mind and heart. It will need new roles for managers, new ways of coordinating work, new values and new ways of communicating.

The Great Repeatable Model (Knowledge@Wharton)
Big Idea: Chris Zook and James Allen, argue that companies should look first at what they are doing right. Their multiyear study of hundreds of organizations has led them to the belief that the best-performing companies maintain a simple, repeatable business model.  In the following excerpt from their book, Zook and Allen cite three successes that represent their model of repeatability — India’s tiffin tin, Ikea’s Billy bookcase and Nike’s swoosh.

‘Inside Apple’: Adam Lashinsky on the Future of America’s Most Secretive Company (Knowledge@Wharton)
Big Idea: Adam Lashinsky, a senior editor at Fortune magazine, provides a rare glimpse into one of the world’s most innovative firms. Knowledge@Wharton recently had an opportunity to talk with Lashinsky about just how far Apple’s secrecy extends, how the company will fare without Steve Jobs and what types of changes to expect under Tim Cook’s leadership.

Gary Hamel: What Matters Now: Values! (Forbes)
Big Idea: Clearly we are facing a crisis of capitalism. The problem is not so much with capitalism but rather with today’s capitalists. As Adam Smith would have said, you can’t really have the freedoms that are implied in capitalism without a very strong ethical foundation.

Make Room for the Chief Customer Officer (Inc.)
Big Idea: More and more companies are reconfiguring their C Suites to accommodate a new kind of chief: the chief of customers.  The CCO has one key responsibility: to ensure that the customer is taken into consideration at all times, in all departments, and in all major decisions.

The Decline of the HPPO (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion) (Sloan Management Review)
Big Idea: The idea that the best minds and the best solutions are often outside our organizations is central to this new mindset, McAfee says. Companies must be willing to seek out those experts wherever they may be.

Winning Practices of Adaptive Leadership Teams (BCG Perspectives)
Big Idea: The freedom to be more adaptive, a leadership capability increasingly recognized as a driver of high-performance, comes from adopting some highly disciplined practices.  This detailed BCG study describes the key traits and best practices that make the teamwork of adaptive leaders more effective and a source of competitive advantage.

Toll House Takes The Middle East (Fast Company)
Big Idea: Nestlé Toll House Café by Chip has more than 100 locations serving upwards of 60 million customers per year in the U.S., Canada, Kuwait, Lebanon, and Dubai, with plans to open additional cafes in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Dalal estimates net sales hovered between $35 and $40 million last year. That’s a heck of a lot of chocolate chips, but Dalal hungers (literally and figuratively) for more.  Just before he jetted off to Dubai to supervise the opening of another Nestlé Toll House Café by Chip, Dalal sat down with Fast Company to discuss his journey from real estate rags to chocolate chip riches.

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